Design Miami
May 3, 2020
SPRING, a virtual exhibition May 2020
May 3, 2020
WINTER LIGHTS
January 9 – april 11, 2020
Kostia, Léa Mestres, Célia Bertrand, Sumphat, Roberto Frankenberg, Gaspard et Philippe Moisan, Jean Grisoni, Nathalie Nahon.
Light carries a large part of the sun's energy and maintains the balance of the natural environment with the regeneration of oxygen by the chlorophyll in plants. Through their work on light, the artists in this exhibition seek to find harmony in the initial chaos, and even to project the idea of an urgent ethics of our behaviour towards nature.

Their work with light is expressed here through different materials: bronze, ceramics, glass, plaster or photography.

. In Philippe Moisan's photos, enhanced with gold leaf by Gaspard according to the ancestral Thai technique, the Japanese principles Yuugen (mysteries and emotions impossible to transcribe into words), Komorebi (the flood of light between the leaves) and Shinrinyoku (peace and silence alone in the woods) find an echo. The Sumphat candleholder (or multi-soliflores) and its Nenuphars tables oscillate between the fragility of the branchs and the durability of the bronze, always suggesting the precious hidden in nature.

Roberto Frankenberg's jungle plunges us between chaos and harmony.

Kostia's wall light, projecting the shadow of the tree from which the original mushroom came, invite us to reflect on a disappearing nature, of which we would only have a memory.

Léa's organic work makes us think of a cactus construction, the only survivor in a world where forests burn at its antipodes.

Three different atmospheres emerge from this exhibition:
The Forest: the raw atmosphere of the alliance of metal and wood. Jean Grisoni, Kostia, Timothée Musset, Gaspard and Philippe Moisan focus their research on the texture and strength of the material.
The vegetal: The works presented by Célia Bertrand, Audrey Galais and Sumphat are graceful, they play on lines and curves. In Célia's luminous sculptures, white gold plays with reflections, while the translucent porcelain lets the light pass randomly through its cracks and reliefs, creating a play of living shadows through the material. The branches seem to emerge from Audrey Galais' pedestal table. It is the fragility, the delicacy of the plant world that is evoked.
A moonlight landscape: Nathalie Nahon, through her luminous sculptures in blown glass and brass, evokes the moon. Her research takes source in the imagination of dance, the rigour of the lines confronts the softness of the luminous sphere.
Andreea Braescu's bouquet of porcelain leaves seems to fly above, as if carried away by a breath of wind.

Through their various works, these artists want, in this exhibition, to give back to nature its central place in the world. Isn't the winter light the one that softens the bare landscapes?