SPRING, a virtual exhibition
May 2020
May 3, 2020
Brutalisme Céleste
17 may / 31 July 2020
Nadège Mouyssinat / Jean Grisoni
 
 
The slowness and patience required to work with porcelain or bronze contrasts with the very immediate and reactive rhythm of our digital age. Porcelain, ceramics in general, and bronze, are materials that last over time, they are resistant, rotproof... This resistant act, is also a search for eternity, notably by executing gestures that have remained unchanged for centuries, gestures "out of time".

Nadège Mouyssinat evolved during 10 years in the very demanding world of luxury products, she was a designer for porcelain factories in Limoges. She uses the Savoir-Faire of porcelain, very anchored in a territory (Limoges), full of history. She builds a sensual, organic and intriguing universe, between installation and sculpture. The aesthetics of the forms produced by Nadège Mouyssinat is the fruit of a research nourished by literature, history and legends.

"In my practice as an artist, I voluntarily put forward an almost virtuoso execution, which tends towards perfection, mastery and sometimes complexity.
This is not an exercise in style since this cold and fixed sensuality of the "well done" piece has a desired and assumed place in my artistic approach. I like to echo it with the doubt, the "unidentifiable", the mysterious, in the manner of those predatory or poisonous flowers that have only their beauty to attract their prey. The "beautiful", the vibration it gives off, the attraction and the distance it provokes, is a central questioning in my work. » "Beauty is always weird. I don't mean that he is willfully, coldly weird, because in that case he would be a monster off the rails of life. I'm saying that it always contains a bit of weirdness, unwanted, unconscious weirdness, and it is this weirdness that makes it particularly the Beautiful. "Baudelaire



 
 

Jean Grisoni, coming from the worlds of image and contemporary jewellery, confronts us with his refined brutality: Drawing most of his inspiration from his native Mediterranean, he follows the artist's furniture approach, and remains in his register of brutalist poetry.

He is inspired by the mineral aridity of the coasts, the particular light of the austere roughness and always cultivates oppositions, creating emotion. He exploits the contrasts of rough and smooth, poor material and rich detail, power and delicacy, shadow and brightness, modest and flamboyant, brutal gesture and fragile poetry.

Single pieces or very short series, he marks his bronzes with dark patinas, shards of wear and tear, lacquer, gold leaf and silver clasps.


 
 
Through their very different approaches, Nadège and Jean take us into the dark and vibrant living world.